Uses of Tie Knots: (Upper Left to Right)
If you want to step up your tie game, make yourself familiar not only with different tie knots, but also, with what each knot’s strength and weaknesses are.
1. The Small Knot: This tie is of a thick material. In order not to overwhelm the small collar, a Small Knot—the simplest knot there is—can be used. Note how well the bottom of the small knot aligns with the bottom of the short collar.
2. The Four-in-Hand: to fit well within the narrow space made by a long collar, the conical Four-in-Hand knot is a great choice. This is a collar and knot perhaps best suited for rounder faces, and/or shorter necks as it will compensate with a narrow feel. This is said to be the most widely-used knot. Note how well the bottom of this long knot aligns with the bottom of the long collar.
3. Half-Windsor: This tie is of a very thick fabric, and the collar leaves us a space too narrow for a Windsor, so a Half-Windsor was used. Looking at it again, it’s clear that a Prince Albert knot would have served this long collared shirt better. The Half-Windsor has far too much space here than it knows what to do with.
4: The Windsor (or “Full Windsor”; calling it a “Double Windsor” is incorrect): The Windsor is the most complex, symmetrical, chunky, and perhaps beautiful, knot. Given many flattering titles such as the “king” or “Don” of knots, as well as “the rich man’s knot.” Very suited to spread collars, where the angle of the space between the collar is greater than 90 degrees. Use with care if your neck is wide or your face very round, as it will amplify these things. A good bet if you want to jazz up an unassuming shirt or impress those who can tell a Pratt from a Windsor.
Note the dimple in each tie, just below the knot. This is the “cherry on top” of a well-fashioned knot.
Most of all, have fun!

Uses of Tie Knots: (Upper Left to Right)

If you want to step up your tie game, make yourself familiar not only with different tie knots, but also, with what each knot’s strength and weaknesses are.

1. The Small Knot: This tie is of a thick material. In order not to overwhelm the small collar, a Small Knot—the simplest knot there is—can be used. Note how well the bottom of the small knot aligns with the bottom of the short collar.

2. The Four-in-Hand: to fit well within the narrow space made by a long collar, the conical Four-in-Hand knot is a great choice. This is a collar and knot perhaps best suited for rounder faces, and/or shorter necks as it will compensate with a narrow feel. This is said to be the most widely-used knot. Note how well the bottom of this long knot aligns with the bottom of the long collar.

3. Half-Windsor: This tie is of a very thick fabric, and the collar leaves us a space too narrow for a Windsor, so a Half-Windsor was used. Looking at it again, it’s clear that a Prince Albert knot would have served this long collared shirt better. The Half-Windsor has far too much space here than it knows what to do with.

4: The Windsor (or “Full Windsor”; calling it a “Double Windsor” is incorrect): The Windsor is the most complex, symmetrical, chunky, and perhaps beautiful, knot. Given many flattering titles such as the “king” or “Don” of knots, as well as “the rich man’s knot.” Very suited to spread collars, where the angle of the space between the collar is greater than 90 degrees. Use with care if your neck is wide or your face very round, as it will amplify these things. A good bet if you want to jazz up an unassuming shirt or impress those who can tell a Pratt from a Windsor.

Note the dimple in each tie, just below the knot. This is the “cherry on top” of a well-fashioned knot.

Most of all, have fun!

2 years ago

  1. le-flaneur-du-monde reblogged this from nezua
  2. interstitial77 reblogged this from nezua
  3. protoslacker said: The Pratt or Shelby knot is very useful too.
  4. polerin reblogged this from justasexgeek and added:
    *internal squee* Don’t mind me Postmod. *still Squeeing*
  5. justasexgeek reblogged this from nezua and added:
    Now I just need to learn how to do these.
  6. nezua posted this